Ashish Valentine

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Colorado is trying to fight both poverty and climate change by retrofitting low-income homes. Now, the state is set to get a big boost from the infrastructure law Congress just passed. Sam Brasch of Colorado Public Radio reports.

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Scientists and world leaders have warned from the beginning of the pandemic that nobody is safe until the entire world is vaccinated against the coronavirus. Here's how President Biden put it on Monday.

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Over the past year and a half, we have been remembering some of the more than 750,000 people who've died of COVID-19 in the U.S., and we've asked you to share their stories with us.

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As jury selection continues for the trial of three white men charged with the murder of Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick, Ga. last year, one particular law is expected to become a focal point.

Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man, was shot while jogging. The defendants said they were trying to make a citizen's arrest.

We break down the history of citizen arrests, and how the law could weigh on the upcoming trial.

Where did citizen's arrest laws come from?

These laws are old.

The co-leader of New Zealand's Maori Party, Debbie Ngarewa-Packer, says the country's new COVID-19 strategy amounts to a "death warrant" for Indigenous communities.

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